Dailey’s Kitchen

Just discovered a hidden gem in downtown Allegan:  Dailey’s Kitchen.   100% Certified Grilladelic

You sit, order and eat in a kitchen.  Literally.  It is tight quarters with a basic menu but very fresh ingredients:  Us, “are the tomatoes fresh?”  Them: “Jack just got them at the farmer’s market”.  Nice.

I had a terrific reuben,,,and as a reuben snob, this was top notch, especially with the homemade 1000 Island dressing.  Scot’s veggie pizza was a work of art.  Perhaps the biggest compliment; my brother’s take on the potato salad, “tastes just like mom’s”  (trust me on this, compliments like this do not come often)

My prediction, you will be hearing great things about Dailey’s Kitchen soon, probably in the same breath as other small town eateries like Salt of the Earth and The London Grill.

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Grand Rapids BBQ- A Review of Sandmanns

I've delayed reviewing the local BBQ scene, but GRGrub is certainly one of the best sources of honest reviews of west Michigan food establishments.   

Take this with a grain of kosher salt, because I have not eaten at Sandmanns yet, but the "word-on-the-street" among a few barbecue aficionado is that, even though Sandmanns is good, it doesn't have that wood infused, smoky "low-and-slow" taste to it.  Which is also a common symptom of all Grand Rapids BBQ joints.  That style of BBQ is just not in our DNA. 

I suppose it is a business issue.  It is certainly not very economical to use a wood-burner with 6-18 hour cooks to produce your pulled pork and brisket.  Right?

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The Cole Slaw Chronicles: Part II

I stumbled on this recipe and it tastes, like it sounds…  (need to use a little imagination here) this could be the recipe.  I like the turbinado sugar, olive oil, the two different kinds of vinegars and the simplicity.  

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Modern Hardware Cook Off

Considering this event for Team Grilladelic as a warm-up to the KCBS season. Fun + grills = Certified Grilladelic

Saturday, June 19

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A Memorable Day with a Grill

It was a major throwdown on Memorial Day! Amidst a backdrop of a stunning view of the Kalamazoo River in Allegan and distant booms of thunder and lightening, my nephew, Scot, put together a grilladelic spread; colorful, imaginative and tasty.  

The ingredients were simple:

A Weber kettle, lump charcoal, olive oil, salt & pepper, burgers, hot dogs and the star of the show-  fresh vegetables; (red and green peppers, poblanos, jalapenos, corn, romaine lettuce, mushrooms, grape tomatoes, roma tomatoes, onions, sweet potatoes and asparagus).

The end result was spectacular.

If you haven't tried veggies on the grill yet, give it a shot!  I like a medium to medium-hot grill. Have both direct and indirect heat available.  Then it is just "grill baby grill!"  Make sure you get some char, especially on the peppers and corn…it really brings out the sweetness.  The serendipity of this menu is leftovers: soups and fire roasted salsas are a breeze. 

Certified Grilladelic

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The Cole Slaw Chronicles: Creamy or Vinegary?

Tough decision.  Creamy or Vinegary.

I made an executive decision to go with the clean, crisp, tart taste of a vinegar-based cole slaw to accompany a fish fry (walleye).  No mayo.  

It was outstanding!  


I used the following recipe as the base with a few adjustments.  

 
This coleslaw is made with a tangy vinegar dressing, with sugar, cider vinegar, celery seed, and other seasonings.

Ingredients:

  • 1 large head of cabbage, finely shredded (I used two heads of cabbage, one purple)
  • 1 medium bell pepper, finely chopped (I omitted the bell pepper)
  • 1 medium sweet onions, finely chopped
  • 2 carrots, grated


Dressing:

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 teaspoon dry mustard
  • 1 teaspoon celery seed
  • 1 cup cider vinegar

Preparation:

Combine coleslaw vegetable ingredients; chopped cabbage, chopped bell pepper, chopped onions, and grated carrots in a large serving bowl. 


In a saucepan over medium heat, combine remaining ingredients; bring to a boil. Simmer, stirring, until sugar is dissolved; pour over vegetables and toss well. Cover and refrigerate until thoroughly chilled. 


I doubled the recipe (hence the two heads of cabbage) and it served well over 16 people!  

Certified Grilladelic.

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In the (Rib) Eye of the Beholder

Thick cut, rib eye steaks.  $6.99/lb

If it is too good to be true, it probably isn't.

I visited the new D&W Fresh Market last weekend and immediately worked my way to the meat counter.  What caught my eye was a big "SPECIAL".   Ribeye steaks.  $6.99/lb.  One of my favorite steaks for the grill!  I had to return.  Which I did the next day.

The "too-good-to-be-true" anecdote: I selected four steaks and the price rang up to $14.99/lb.  I said "excuse me".  The clerk said "ooops. not sure why it is priced like that.  Let me check".

After reviewing with his manager (not a butcher) it turns out that the sale price referred to "non-prime" steaks. I am not convinced this young man even knew there was a difference between prime, choice, select and standard but at that point, I wasn't prepared to spend the $14.99/lb so I said I wanted the "special".  He went back, grabbed some other steaks and wrapped them up.  There was no grading listed- so I am not sure if it was select or standard. 

That night I seasoned (olive oil, Worcestershire, Lawry's Salt) and grilled over hot mesquite lump.

The results were OK but grading certainly makes a difference in taste.  And I realized I've been spoiled.  I  buy the majority of my steaks and chops from several neighborhood butchers who I trust. They know the cuts I like and ask for feedback when I return. They certainly use pricing and "specials" as marketing tools but IMHO,  the credibility gap between a supermarket meat counter and a neighborhood butcher is as vast as a Nebraskan prairie!

In my book, local butchers are certified grilladelic.

Quality Grades:

  • Prime grade  is produced from young, well-fed beef cattle. It has abundant marbling and is generally sold in restaurants and hotels. Prime roasts and steaks are excellent for dry-heat cooking (broiling, roasting, or grilling).

  • Choice grade  is high quality, but has less marbling than Prime. Choice roasts and steaks from the loin and rib will be very tender, juicy, and flavorful and are, like Prime, suited to dry-heat cooking. Many of the less tender cuts, such as those from the rump, round, and blade chuck, can also be cooked with dry heat if not overcooked. Such cuts will be most tender if "braised" — roasted, or simmered with a small amount of liquid in a tightly covered pan.

  • Select grade  is very uniform in quality and normally leaner than the higher grades. It is fairly tender, but, because it has less marbling, it may lack some of the juiciness and flavor of the higher grades. Only the tender cuts (loin, rib, sirloin) should be cooked with dry heat. Other cuts should be marinated before cooking or braised to obtain maximum tenderness and flavor.

  • Standard and Commercial grades – are frequently sold as ungraded or as "store brand" meat.

  • Utility, Cutter, and Canner grades are seldom, if ever, sold at retail but are used instead to make ground beef and processed products.

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