Monthly Archives: December 2009

Grilladelic Greetings from the Front Lines

Holiday tales of cooking over an open fire poured in last night!  Here is a little chatter from a few of my barbecuing and grilling friends:

From the Reame team:

Subject: Over 100 mussles
About 5 pounds of mussles (100+) in garlic, white wine, chopped tomatoes, and great company. Dinner w/ the fam. Huge pan from Hermans Boy

Thanks Brandon!  As always, pushing the envelope and setting the bar high. A beautiful picture. Speaking of the pan, Lodge (made in the USA!) cast iron skillets and Dutch ovens are a terrific compliment to any outdoor kitchen.  Paellas, cobblers, queso fundido, fajitas, are only the tip of the spear of what you can add to your repertoire with a little, well seasoned cast ironIn the west Michigan area, Hermans Boy in Rockford is a great source for these products.

On a more philosophical note, from the Richards family:

Subject: Butt

Why do they call it butt when it's a shoulder?  Brined the pork,  
Weber's almost ready.  Got my rub on. Let's see, smoke it for a bit,  
then make chili verde or, go all the way and make it pulled pork.

Merry Christmas, friend.

That is a good question Chip. Here is what I found out:

"In pre-revolutionary New England and into the Revolutionary War, some pork cuts (not those highly valued, or "high on the hog," like loin and ham) were packed into casks or barrels (also known as "butts") for storage and shipment. The way the hog shoulder was cut in the Boston area became known in other regions as "Boston Butt." This name stuck and today, "Boston Butt" is called that almost everywhere in the US,… except in Boston.

This answer comes from the experts at the National Pork Board.

George W. Royal"

Smoked "Boston Butt" expert Chef

Still plenty of time for great grilling and barbecue in 2009. Try to end this decade on a high and smoky note.  Pictures and comments are welcome.

Grilladelicly yours,

Uncle John

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Freezer Beef School Recap

Link: http://meatisneat.wordpress.com/2009/12/16/freezer-beef-school-recap/ (sent via addtoany)

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The Secret Sauce?

Is it this simple? 

From Bon Appetit

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A Perfect Gift: A Fantastic & Underrated Cookbook…

This cookbook is certified grilladelic.  Great recipes, terrific visuals and a good read.

I believe it is Steve Raichlen's first book too!

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Twitter, #Meatcamp and The Secret Sauce

I participated in my second Twitter conference last night; #Meatcamp.  The folks contributing had diverse backgrounds; ranchers, chefs, researchers (Department of Agriculture), and multiple "foodies".   It was cool.  A lot of information and different perspectives.  You can search Twitter using the hash tag #meatcamp but here are a few of the things I learned. (these are selected tweets I copied from the session)

Lesson #1: On the importance of the butcher:

meatcamp Exactly, @smfierro the butcher (and trucker/slaughter folks) have huge impact on flavor. Aging & cutting technique are art forms #meatcamp

meatcamp
Artisan butcher = experience in slaughter but can determine how to age, hang, break carcass & trim for yield, appearance & texture #meatcamp


iTweetMeat @AdrianaV Meatcutter is meatcutter. Butcher is stockman + slaughterman + meatcutter, thus in tune to whole process. #meatcamp

meatcamp Most butchers (meatcutters) these days receive boxes of "primals" e.g. whole NY Strip Loin & just cut into steaks. #meatcamp

My take away:  Good butchers are hard to find.  Really good butchers are even harder to find. 

Lesson #2There is a lot of art to the meat sciences

meatcamp Meat flavor/texture just like wine: influenced by breed (grape variety), specific genetics (rootstock), region, husbandry… aging #meatcamp


iTweetMeat RT @Pleasanthouse: Commodity beef kind of like bud/miller of beef world. Consistent flavor/texture. #meatcamp

Grass_Fed_Beef_ RT@:@iTweetMeatAlmost all beef tastes like beef,like wine tastes like wine. But diff'ce from farm2farm as great as w/wine#meatcamp #meatcamp

My take away: Finding a great steak for the grill has become much more interesting.

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Certified Grilladelic

I was asked to describe "grilladelic" using only images and key words. 

Family Friends Joy Music Authentic Tradition Art Craftsmanship Spice Education Coals Stories Natural Work Neighborhood Neon Smoke Party Picnic Obsession Passion

It's a big tent folks!

Happy Holidays

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A Mrs. Dog’s Christmas: Certified Grilladelic

If you are a lover (or know someone who is) of grilling, barbecue. buying local, entrepreneurship, Big Green Eggs, great sauces and marinades, good people, and good parties, I have the perfect Christmas gift suggestion for you:

Mrs. Dogs.  A Grand Rapids, MI original.

I have known Steve and Julie Applegate a long time and there is not finer people nor passionate grilling experts in the midwest.

Mrs.Dogs products are unique and can a long way to "unleashing" the inner junkyard barbecue dog in you.  

Mrs. Dogs is certified Grilladelic

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